Rustic Workshop Trunk Makeover (Before & After)

Rustic Workshop Trunk Makeover (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

Rustic Workshop Trunk Makeover (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

Well, the last three weeks have been quite an adventure. We’ve had breakdowns, accidents, injuries, life changes, work changes and exhaustion. For awhile there, I was on a simple loop of coping and sleeping. Things seem to be getting to a state of equilibrium now, in my new normal. I’ve been wanting to show you what I’ve been up to, and I’m so thankful I have the time and space to do that again.

First up, my workshop trunk. This little trunk had been waiting for soooo long for it’s turn under the paint brush! I found it at the Goodwill years ago and I’ve been using it for storage in my workshop (i.e. office-slash-craft-room) ever since. I think it was originally a cherry-style finish, but somewhere along the way someone had attempted to paint it. It looked like part spray paint and part latex painted with a roller. Even with all the “distressing” it’s gotten over the years (read: total abuse and neglect), it just didn’t get better. It was shabby, but not in a good way. [Read more...]


Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After)

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

I‘ve been working on my workshop (craft-slash-office space) for some time. I knew that I wanted to paint the main work table, but I could NOT decide what color or style. Stained top? Painted legs? Plain white? Something fun? It’s been a major stumbling block for moving forward on this room. That and the jigsaw puzzle of figuring out that plus everything else — walls, other furniture, slipcovers…

Well, as you know, I finally decided (thanks to the inspiration from Pinterest and this book), to keep the walls white. Then I decided to refinish the wood buffet (still in progress). Which meant, yay, I could paint the table. I knew I wanted the top to be white to aid in photography for the blog, but I also wanted something fun since the rest of the decisions so far have been pretty staid. But what?

Kathy of Petticoat Junktion to the rescue!!

I was reading her amazing blog, and saw this adorable grain-sack inspired table:

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via Petticoat Junktion

Isn’t that swwony? I mean, who could resist with the cute turquoise paint and the vintage quilts and chenille. I emailed Karen immediately and asked her if I could copy her for my table, and she graciously said yes (and also said I could share a picture or two of hers here so you could see — thank you, Kathy!!).

This is how I did it. First I had to pick a color. True to form, this was agonizing and took a long time. Here’s just a few of the samples I tried (some new, some from my stash)

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

I’m glad I held out until I found the exact vintage-y blue-y green-y color I was looking for. The legs are Aloe (SW 6464) and the top is Steamed Milk (SW 7554).

I drug the table outside, sanded the top some and stained it dark walnut to give it some age before I painted. The top got a coat of primer and two coats of white, and the legs just got two coats of green since they had been primed and painted white by the previous owner.

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

Once the paint was dry I distressed it, then brought it inside to do the stripe. I used the same basic technique that Kathy did, shown here:

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via Petticoat Junktion

I used plain masking tape to tape off the center stripe, because that’s what I had on hand, so I cut in against the tape when I painted my center stripe. Then, like Kathy, I hand-painted the thin stripes with a tiny little brush. I used the tape as a guide to keep them straight. They’re definitely hand painted (read, wobbly) and I love them.

I distressed the stripe, too, just a bit, then polyed the whole thing. Three coats, and I buffed in between. I don’t usually bother with multiple coats or buffing, but with a table that will get hard use I thought it would be worth it.

My work table is a repurposed kitchen table that I got for $40 at a garage sale. It’s a standard 3′ x 5′ table, and I thought a 3″ stripe seemed about right. The skinny stripes are small, maybe 1/4″ wide? And the width of the tape apart from the main stripe. You’ll notice Kathy did two skinny stripes on her table, and it looks great. I did mine from memory and only put one. I actually like Kathy’s version better, but it’s already polyed so I’m going to call it good and be happy!

Here’s a side-by-side comparison of the before and after:

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

And here:

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

I’m completely in love with the whole thing. Too bad it’s covered up most of the time with my works in progress! Ha!

I did take a moment to take some pretty pictures before I put it back to work. Here’s a few:

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com


Grain Sack Workshop Table (Before & After) via cottagemagpie.com

Whew! Now on to the next project.

Do you all struggle as much as I do with making decisions? It seems so effortless for most people!

~Angela :-)

Thank you again, Kathy, for letting me share your great work and copy your idea!

Linking up to: The Shabby Creek Cottage, From My Front Porch to Yours, Fine Craft Guild and Lilyfield Life


How to Hang Small Cabinet Curtains (for Cheap)

How to Hang Small Cabinet Curtains for Cheap via Cottage Magpie

How to Hang Small Cabinet Curtains for Cheap via Cottage Magpie

It would be nice if everything we needed to do in our offices, or kitchens, or workshops had pretty equipment and supplies. It really would. But of course, in most people’s lives there’s things you really need easy access to, but don’t want to necessarily have on display. Like a charging station for example.

In these cases, I like a little curtain to hide the messy business. Why a curtain and not a door? Because with a door you have to fuss with it, open it, leave room to open it… and let’s be honest, I’m not the neatest workshop resident ever. I want to be able to just push the fabric aside, get what I need and move on.

With that in mind, I wanted to hang a little curtain on the front of this vintage cabinet I’ve been working on, but I did NOT want to spend any money on it! I’m on a budget, people! I don’t have money for teeny tiny curtain rods! So I figured out how to make one with some stuff I had laying around. I thought you might like to see how I did it so you can do it, too!

Read on for all the details. [Read more...]


How to Drill a Cabinet Access Hole

How to Drill a Cabinet Access Hole via Cottage Magpie

How to Drill a Cabinet Access Hole via Cottage Magpie

I love thrifted furniture. Often well-built, with more durability and character than anything you could buy new, thrifted furniture is funky and fun. Even more bonus? It’s often cheaper! But, old furniture doesn’t come with all the convenient punch-outs and access panels that new furniture does. So if you’re using an old piece of furniture but want to run power inside, for electronics or a charging station, you’re going to have to put a hole in it. The good news is that since you didn’t pay much for it, if you ruin it, it’s not too big of a deal, right?

So, it’s obvious that you need to cut a hole, but how? Of course there’s many options, but if you want a really nice, clean, round hole, one of the ways I like is to use a spade bit. Now, for those of you who are tool-savvy, this probably seems painfully obvious, but when I started doing my own DIY projects, I had no clue that such things existed, and I thought that there might be other people out there like me. Read on to see just exactly how this weirdly wide bit works so you can try it at home! [Read more...]